Tag: Antonios Antoniou

Two Underrated Tourist Spots in Europe

 Bruges, Belgium pic
Bruges, Belgium
Image: tripadvisor.com

A recognized expert in business and finance, Dr. Antonios Antoniou has received numerous accolades throughout this career, including recognition in the Jean L. Heck and Philip L. Cooley study, “Most Prolific Authors in the Finance Literature: 1959–2008.” In his leisure time, Antonios “Tony” Antoniou enjoys travel and has visited many cities throughout Europe.

London, Paris, and Berlin are often among the cities that top the lists of travelers to Europe. While those are great destinations, there are lesser-known European cities that offer visitors wonderful visual and cultural experiences. Here are two of the most underrated cities in Europe.

Called the “Venice of the North” because of its system of canals, Bruges, Belgium, often takes a backseat to Antwerp and Brussels among visitors to the country, but Bruges is filled with stunning medieval architecture and art. Bruges is where Michelangelo’s famous sculpture, Madonna and Child, currently resides.

Dublin may get most of the attention from tourists visiting Ireland, but Cork can be just as appealing. With friendly locals and a layout that’s easily navigable, the often dubbed “real capital of Ireland” boasts a subdued vibe and is recognized for its focus on high-end cuisine.

The European Foundation for Management Development by Dr Antonios Antoniou

 

European Foundation for Management Development pic
European Foundation for Management Development
Image: efmd.org

Located in Brussels, Belgium, the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) is a global non-profit organization focused on researching, networking, and information sharing within the field of management development. The group comprises more than 750 member organizations representing academia, the public interest, business, and consulting in more than 80 countries.

Members of EFMD enjoy many benefits, such as the connection to a vast global network. Through this network, members can share and discuss their experiences and learn more about best practices. Belonging to EFMD also brings access to a wide variety of the latest and most relevant information through the non-profit’s website, the Global Focus magazine, and organization-sponsored events. In addition, EFMD gives members the use of quality improvement tools, including the Corporate Learning Improvement Process (CLIP) and Technology-Enhanced Learning (CEL).

About the author: An educator and financial expert, Dr Antonios Antoniou possesses a Bachelor of Arts in Economics, a Master of Science in Accounting and Finance, and a Doctorate in Applied Economics. Dr Antoniou is the Chief Executive Officer of Financial Research, Training & Consulting, LLP (FRT&C).

London Airports Offer Less than One Euro per Sterling Pound

 

 Euro
Euro

Antonios Antoniou is the CEO and a consultant for FRT-C Consulting, where he serves as a financial consultant to a medium-sized company. Also a former professor of finance at Brunel University and Durham University, Tony Antoniou stays up-to-date with financial news, including information on the euro.

For the first time since the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union in late June, some London airports are offering exchange rates of less than one euro per pound sterling.

In late August, the MoneyCorp bureau de change at London’s Stansted Airport began offering an exchange rate of €0.9915 for every pound. Similarly, the rate at the ICE exchange center at London Luton Airport was €0.990.

While this does not provide an accurate view of the pound’s overall trading power against the euro, it is the first time since the Brexit vote that the exchange rate has dipped below the one-to-one mark. Other airports, however, offer better rates. While the pound lost ground at other London airports, ICE at Gatwick still offered €1.05 for every pound.

These new rates may look ominous, but The Independent’s travel editor, Simon Calder, assures that in-person airport currency exchanges often provide the worst rates. He says doing the exchange online and picking the cash up in person usually offers better deals, even from the same company.

The airports were surely following the general trading trend. Their low rates came as the pound fell to €1.1622 against the euro, the lowest it has been in three years.

Kane Ready for Champions League Challenges

Harry Kane pic
Harry Kane
Image: tottenhamhotspur.com

Through his assessments of changing global markets, Antonios Antoniou is a recognized authority on investments, risk management, and financial economics. Outside his professional life, Antonios “Tony” Antoniou is an avid fan of London, England’s Tottenham Hotspur Football Club.

Harry Kane, a professional footballer who plays for Tottenham Hotspur, says he is excited about the challenge that lies in front of his team Champions League play this season. The team qualified for the Champions League by finishing third in the Premier League last year. It’s the first time Tottenham has qualified for Champions League play since 2010, when the team knocked off Inter Milan and AC Milan to reach the quarterfinals.

Kane believes his team can manage the competition level it will face this season, stating that enduring these challenges is the price of becoming a top team. Kane also said he is looking forward to the preparation, asserting that the club’s manager is very good at getting the team ready to play.

Nobel Prize-winning Game Theory Solutions to International Conflict

The Strategy of Conflict pic
The Strategy of Conflict
Image: amazon.com

The head of Financial Research, Training & Consulting, LLP, Dr. Antonios (Tony) Antoniou previously engaged as professor of finance at Durham University in the United Kingdom. Dr. Antonios Antoniou has a strong interest in finance and banking systems, and is particularly drawn to the way in which economic interests can be a vital tool in conflict resolution.

In 2005, a pair of researchers spanning the University of Maryland and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem earned a Nobel Prize in economics for employing game theory in examining conflicts between corporations and nations. Game theory is an interactive analytical framework that provides a way of evaluating strategies ranging from wars to international trade agreements.

The scholars’ groundbreaking work examined how cooperation is successfully enacted among certain groups of countries and organizations while others remain conflict prone. They built on research extending to the 1950s and Prof. Thomas C. Schelling’s classic book The Strategy of Conflict (1981), which illustrates how significantly worsening one’s options can strengthen one’s competitive position, and that maintaining ability to retaliate is often more vital than resisting attack.

Seen through a Cold War lens, these insights had an outsized role in defining efforts to avoid nuclear war and negotiate an end to seemingly intractable conflicts.

Euro Zone Economy Sluggish Despite Growth Measures

Euro Zone Economy pic
Euro Zone Economy
Image: economist.com

Dr. Antonios (Tony) Antoniou has a background as finance professor with Durham University, where he was responsible for oversight of strategic planning and curriculum development within the Business School. With a longstanding interest in economic prosperity and the globalization process, Dr. Antonios Antoniou follows economic development trends among Euro currency-linked countries.

With the European Union having been buffeted by a number of crises, from Greece’s debt issues to an influx of refugees from war-torn Syria, the 19-strong Eurozone is continuing to experience low growth. A February 2016 Economist survey noted that GDP still lagged behind pre-financial crisis 2008 levels, while the U.S. economy had surged ahead by 10 percent.

The Economist painted this as particularly dire, considering the positive effect that an oil price collapse had had in driving consumer spending growth, which is seen as a pathway toward recovery. Eurozone sluggishness has also resisted measures by the European Central Bank to spark growth through a policy of negative interest rates and quantitative easing, which involves printing money to purchase financial assets. Despite these macro-level efforts, stock markets are unsure of their footing, and exports of key products to emerging markets (for example, German luxury cars to China) have been dwindling.

Looking at Conflict with Game Theory

Game Theory pic
Game Theory
Image: nobelprize.org

Dr. Antonios (Tony) Antoniou is an expert in business and finance and achieved recognition in Jean I. Heck and Philip L. Cooley’s study, “Most Prolific Authors in the Finance Literature: 1959 – 2008.” Amid Dr. Antonios Antoniou’s research interests is the question of how economics can be used in conflict resolution.

In 2005, Robert J. Aumann and Thomas C. Schelling won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences when they used economic game theory to study conflicts such as wars, wage negotiations, trade, and even organized crime.

Game theory, which is sometimes called interactive decision theory, explores how agents in conflict make decisions when their choices are interdependent, and predicts actions based on what each agent believes the other agent will do.

Schelling’s book, The Strategy of Conflict, proposed game theory as an effective way to understand conflict in the context of the nuclear arms race in the late 1950s. Aumann later built on Schelling’s ideas to explore what game theory can reveal about longer term relations. Game theory has become a dominant strategy for understanding and predicting conflict in a range of contexts.

Are MBA Programs Still Relevant?

MBA Relevance pic
MBA Relevance
Image: forbes.com

Dr. Antonios (Tony) Antoniou is a prolific writer and consultant with extensive experience in business, finance, and economics. As such, Dr. Antonios Antoniou stays abreast of field-related issues, such as questions about how MBA programs hold up amid today’s economic realities.

Since 1985, the demand for traditional two-year MBA programs has dipped periodically and leveled off in recent years. In an era of recession where there is a growing demand for entrepreneurship and a need for innovative solutions to the world’s problems, some believe that MBA programs as they currently exist may not offer enough to students who want to succeed today.

Some MBA programs are answering to these issues by innovating their teaching models. Here, students can look at real companies in their startup phase rather than simply at case studies, and are being trained to think more like entrepreneurs.

Even the traditional MBA programs still have benefits, however, at least on the financial level. Students are usually able to pay back their investment within 3.9 years, and graduates from accredited schools typically have salaries that are 50 percent higher than what they were earning before they went to business school. As these programs innovate and offer more useful real-world information, graduates may indeed still find success from achieving a MBA.

Management vs. Leadership

Management vs. Leadership pic
Management vs. Leadership
Image: forbes.com

Antonios “Tony” Antoniou is the chief executive officer of Financial Research, Training & Consulting, LLP. Over the course of his career, Antonios Antoniou has established himself as a highly effective manager and business leader.

Although the concepts of management and leadership share many of the same characteristics, there are a number or key differences between them. Successful managers must demonstrate the ability to execute a strategic plan by dividing it into small pieces and distributing tasks among team members. Managers must also establish processes and procedures to guide a team and anticipate needs that may arise in the future.

While management deals primarily with the execution of tasks and the delegation of responsibilities, leadership involves less tangible attributes such as honesty, integrity, and inspiration. The best leaders help their teams perform to their maximum potential and communicate the details of projects effectively. When necessary, leaders must be able to challenge established procedures and think outside the box, always searching for the most efficient way to achieve their objectives.

The Pros and Cons of Globalization

Global Finance pic
Global Finance
Image: finance.laws.com

The chief executive officer of Financial Research, Training & Consulting, LLP, Antonios “Tony” Antoniou spent the better part of 15 years as a professor of finance and economics at Brunel University and Durham University. During his time in academia, Antonios Antoniou taught courses in several areas of global finance.

In the wake of rapid globalization occurring over the past several decades, winners and losers have emerged in regions throughout the world. Perhaps no group has benefited more from globalization than the so-called “global middle class,” which includes emerging economies such as those of China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia. While the top 1 percent of the world’s earners have seen significant gains from globalization, those at the bottom of the economic ladder have seen their situation in the world economy worsen.

According to economist Branko Milanovic, ensuring shared prosperity must involve high growth rates among nations at the bottom, which has already occurred in places such as India and China. Milanovic also suggests a global wealth redistribution plan, although efforts to date have been unenthusiastic at best. Finally, Milanovic contends that free migration of labor would allow people the chance to prosper, regardless of where they end up.